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Top Tips For Potty Training Accidents

It is inevitable that your child will have accidents when he or she is being potty trained. Be supportive, even when your child has not successfully used the toilet. With time, the accidents should become fewer and fewer until your child is completely potty trained and accidents are few and far between.

It’s been a long time since you were in diapers. Parents often do not realize that their children have accidents simply because they think differently. A child cannot plan ahead the way adults do every day — how many times, for example, do you jump in the car for a long trip with an older child and he or she needs to stop for a restroom less then ten minutes into the trip? Toddlers have an even shorter planning ability. They may hold it, thinking they can wait to use the potty when their television program or game is finished. Often, this is not the case, and the result is an accident.

Your child may also simply not realize he or she needs to use the potty. Even if your child has previously voiced the need to go to the restroom, other activities, such as being engrossed in play, can take your child’s mind off bodily needs. Ask you child often if he or she needs to use the potty, just as you would ask him or her to drink water on a hot day.

Be consistent with potty training rules as well to prevent these accidents. Your child may be doing this on purpose to gauge your reaction. Accidents should never result in punishment, but be firm as to what your child can and cannot do until he or she is potty trained. Regular accidents are not OK if your child knows better and had previously been able to control his or her bathroom actions.

However, if your child is having regular accidents and is upset at this, consult your doctor. There may be medical reason as to when potty training is becoming more difficult, and sometimes, simple dietary changes can help you fix these problems. Most children have accidents up to 6 months after successful toilet training. If accidents continue, speak with your child about the situation. If he or she is deliberately causing accidents, you may wish to postpone potty training until he or she is more mature. Punishment in these situations rarely works, but don’t let your child use potty training as a way of getting attention.

Accidents are normal. Although undesirable, remember to be supportive of your child as he or she is trying to learn to use the potty, even when they’re unsuccessful. Join an online support group if you find this process especially stressful. This, along with the multiple articles and tools for parents, can help you learn more techniques for potty training more quickly and avoiding accidents. Use accidents as a learning tool. As your child progresses in the potty training process, he or she will have fewer accidents. Don’t be surprised if your child regresses after having made significant progress—potty training takes time and support and is often a case of two steps forward and one step back.

 
About The Author: Diane Ball has an interest in Potty Training.
For further information on Potty Training please visit
http://www.painlesspottytraining.com/potty-training.html or
http://www.painlesspottytraining.com/blog/2006/09/27/top-tips-for-potty-training-accidents/

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